Outfit of the Day, Details, 29 September 2014

Got my embellished bracelet, black leather slingbacks with the cute striped socks, faux leather side stripe leggings, and lace and houndstooth top. Altogether, it looks great, but sometimes you have to enjoy the individual details to see how it really comes together.

Outfit of the Day, Details, 29 September 2014

Got my embellished bracelet, black leather slingbacks with the cute striped socks, faux leather side stripe leggings, and lace and houndstooth top. Altogether, it looks great, but sometimes you have to enjoy the individual details to see how it really comes together.

alternativeblackgirl:

jatel0:

For The Masses:
http://gen.lib.rus.ec
http://textbooknova.com
http://en.bookfi.org/
http://www.gutenberg.org
http://ebookee.org
http://www.manybooks.net
http://www.giuciao.com
http://www.feedurbrain.com
http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=380
http://www.alleng.ru/ 
http://www.eknigu.com/ 
http://ishare.iask.sina.com.cn/
http://2020ok.com/
http://www.freebookspot.es/Default.aspx
http://www.freeetextbooks.com/
http://onebigtorrent.org/
http://www.downeu.me/ebook/
http://forums.mvgroup.org
http://theaudiobookbay.com/
More Here

Reblog to save a life.

astronomifier:

rachelhaimowitz:

obsessionisaperfume:

deadcatwithaflamethrower:

queensimia:

palavenblues:

holy shit there is a name for it

Well damn. Explains a lot.

Suddenly I understand some of my fan base a LOT better.  That is Awesome. 

"holy shit there is a name for it" was my reaction before I even scrolled down to the comments.

I just need to keep reblogging this because I cannot even begin to tell you how profound a feeling of YES and THIS and THERE IS A WORD FOR ME OMG I get every time I see this, and I hope it helps others too.

seriously, anytime you see a post with a comment saying “theres a name for it?!” reblog that post because even if it doesnt apply to you any of your followers could be waiting for that revelation.

astronomifier:

rachelhaimowitz:

obsessionisaperfume:

deadcatwithaflamethrower:

queensimia:

palavenblues:

holy shit there is a name for it

Well damn. Explains a lot.

Suddenly I understand some of my fan base a LOT better.  That is Awesome. 

"holy shit there is a name for it" was my reaction before I even scrolled down to the comments.

I just need to keep reblogging this because I cannot even begin to tell you how profound a feeling of YES and THIS and THERE IS A WORD FOR ME OMG I get every time I see this, and I hope it helps others too.

seriously, anytime you see a post with a comment saying “theres a name for it?!” reblog that post because even if it doesnt apply to you any of your followers could be waiting for that revelation.

(via dyemelikeasunset)

biodiverseed:


foodwarriornetwork:
The streets of San Francisco are lined with pear, plum and apple trees thanks to ‘guerilla grafters’ secretly grafting fruit-bearing scions onto ornamental, non-fruit bearing trees making fresh fruit free and available to everyone who wishes to pick some.
'All you have to do is make a slit with a knife in a branch on the host tree, insert a branch from a fruit-bearing tree, and secure it with tape.  Once it heals, it connects.” — Tara Hui started the movement and has been grafting fruit branches to city trees for two years now.
How great would it be to see free fruit from guerilla grafters growing in your city?  Want to start a trend?

You’d have to know your stuff to do this right (ie. graft edible apples on to compatible flowering crab apples, graft edible cherries [or other prunus] onto compatible flowering cherries, graft compatible pears onto flowering quince, undsoweiter.)!
I think if you know what you are doing, it could be ok, but people would need to remember to use healthy scion wood and clean equipment, because they could devastate a whole expensive, established boulevard with fungal diseases or pests if they don’t seal their grafts properly, or clean their equipment between uses.
I am also hesitant about it, simply because people tend to not like roadside food: it gets covered in car exhaust and particulate matter, there is significant heavy metal pollution (ie. lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, zinc) in the soil, people feel ashamed or embarrassed about having to get their food that way, and/or people simply don’t trust public food sources (if you grew up with the “razor blades in the apples” paranoia about Halloween candy, you’ll understand). There are a huge number of apple trees growing by roadsides here in Denmark, and a huge number of apples on the ground that rot and swarm with wasps: and then someone has to clean them up. People just don’t seem to want to eat them, or pick them when they are by the road. Ornamental apples have much less biomass and much less sugar, so they decompose more quickly and don’t attract so many bugs.
Moreover, I’ve met people who think the apples that grow in their yard or neighbourhood are “dirty” and they only trust the waxed, store-bought varieties: knowledge about food production, or the ability to identify what is food in the “wild” is rarer than you would think.
These sorts of things are much better situated with public parks that double as food forests, empty lots that have been given a bit of a soil makeover to remove bio-accumulative toxic metals, or dedicated community gardens.
In terms of what is good to plant along roadsides: flowers! Lots and lots of flowers! They will break down soil pollutants over time, and also help the bees. Plus, you can plant native flowers and help conserve your biome’s biodiversity, rather than planting a foreign apple that may not be the right foodstuffs for your local pollinators.
"Greedy Gardeners" in NYT covers this facet of the issue.
All in all, it’s an idea with good intentions, but it probably won’t have the desired effect. It’s a sort of condescending, impermanent solution to a structural problem. There are a number of people in the communities that are being “served” by these kinds of initiatives who also object to the idea, or rather the manner in which it is enacted.
Frankly Not About Food Forests | - Black Girl Dangerous
#forest gardening #edible landscaping #grafting #fruit trees
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:


foodwarriornetwork:
The streets of San Francisco are lined with pear, plum and apple trees thanks to ‘guerilla grafters’ secretly grafting fruit-bearing scions onto ornamental, non-fruit bearing trees making fresh fruit free and available to everyone who wishes to pick some.
'All you have to do is make a slit with a knife in a branch on the host tree, insert a branch from a fruit-bearing tree, and secure it with tape.  Once it heals, it connects.” — Tara Hui started the movement and has been grafting fruit branches to city trees for two years now.
How great would it be to see free fruit from guerilla grafters growing in your city?  Want to start a trend?

You’d have to know your stuff to do this right (ie. graft edible apples on to compatible flowering crab apples, graft edible cherries [or other prunus] onto compatible flowering cherries, graft compatible pears onto flowering quince, undsoweiter.)!
I think if you know what you are doing, it could be ok, but people would need to remember to use healthy scion wood and clean equipment, because they could devastate a whole expensive, established boulevard with fungal diseases or pests if they don’t seal their grafts properly, or clean their equipment between uses.
I am also hesitant about it, simply because people tend to not like roadside food: it gets covered in car exhaust and particulate matter, there is significant heavy metal pollution (ie. lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, zinc) in the soil, people feel ashamed or embarrassed about having to get their food that way, and/or people simply don’t trust public food sources (if you grew up with the “razor blades in the apples” paranoia about Halloween candy, you’ll understand). There are a huge number of apple trees growing by roadsides here in Denmark, and a huge number of apples on the ground that rot and swarm with wasps: and then someone has to clean them up. People just don’t seem to want to eat them, or pick them when they are by the road. Ornamental apples have much less biomass and much less sugar, so they decompose more quickly and don’t attract so many bugs.
Moreover, I’ve met people who think the apples that grow in their yard or neighbourhood are “dirty” and they only trust the waxed, store-bought varieties: knowledge about food production, or the ability to identify what is food in the “wild” is rarer than you would think.
These sorts of things are much better situated with public parks that double as food forests, empty lots that have been given a bit of a soil makeover to remove bio-accumulative toxic metals, or dedicated community gardens.
In terms of what is good to plant along roadsides: flowers! Lots and lots of flowers! They will break down soil pollutants over time, and also help the bees. Plus, you can plant native flowers and help conserve your biome’s biodiversity, rather than planting a foreign apple that may not be the right foodstuffs for your local pollinators.
"Greedy Gardeners" in NYT covers this facet of the issue.
All in all, it’s an idea with good intentions, but it probably won’t have the desired effect. It’s a sort of condescending, impermanent solution to a structural problem. There are a number of people in the communities that are being “served” by these kinds of initiatives who also object to the idea, or rather the manner in which it is enacted.
Frankly Not About Food Forests | - Black Girl Dangerous
#forest gardening #edible landscaping #grafting #fruit trees
Zoom Info

biodiverseed:

foodwarriornetwork:

The streets of San Francisco are lined with pear, plum and apple trees thanks to ‘guerilla grafters’ secretly grafting fruit-bearing scions onto ornamental, non-fruit bearing trees making fresh fruit free and available to everyone who wishes to pick some.

'All you have to do is make a slit with a knife in a branch on the host tree, insert a branch from a fruit-bearing tree, and secure it with tape.  Once it heals, it connects.” — Tara Hui started the movement and has been grafting fruit branches to city trees for two years now.

How great would it be to see free fruit from guerilla grafters growing in your city?  Want to start a trend?

You’d have to know your stuff to do this right (ie. graft edible apples on to compatible flowering crab apples, graft edible cherries [or other prunus] onto compatible flowering cherries, graft compatible pears onto flowering quince, undsoweiter.)!

I think if you know what you are doing, it could be ok, but people would need to remember to use healthy scion wood and clean equipment, because they could devastate a whole expensive, established boulevard with fungal diseases or pests if they don’t seal their grafts properly, or clean their equipment between uses.

I am also hesitant about it, simply because people tend to not like roadside food: it gets covered in car exhaust and particulate matter, there is significant heavy metal pollution (ie. lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, zinc) in the soil, people feel ashamed or embarrassed about having to get their food that way, and/or people simply don’t trust public food sources (if you grew up with the “razor blades in the apples” paranoia about Halloween candy, you’ll understand). There are a huge number of apple trees growing by roadsides here in Denmark, and a huge number of apples on the ground that rot and swarm with wasps: and then someone has to clean them up. People just don’t seem to want to eat them, or pick them when they are by the road. Ornamental apples have much less biomass and much less sugar, so they decompose more quickly and don’t attract so many bugs.

Moreover, I’ve met people who think the apples that grow in their yard or neighbourhood are “dirty” and they only trust the waxed, store-bought varieties: knowledge about food production, or the ability to identify what is food in the “wild” is rarer than you would think.

These sorts of things are much better situated with public parks that double as food forests, empty lots that have been given a bit of a soil makeover to remove bio-accumulative toxic metals, or dedicated community gardens.

In terms of what is good to plant along roadsides: flowers! Lots and lots of flowers! They will break down soil pollutants over time, and also help the bees. Plus, you can plant native flowers and help conserve your biome’s biodiversity, rather than planting a foreign apple that may not be the right foodstuffs for your local pollinators.

All in all, it’s an idea with good intentions, but it probably won’t have the desired effect. It’s a sort of condescending, impermanent solution to a structural problem. There are a number of people in the communities that are being “served” by these kinds of initiatives who also object to the idea, or rather the manner in which it is enacted.

#forest gardening #edible landscaping #grafting #fruit trees

(via neboolia)

gossipseer:

witchlingfumbles:

soufflenatural:

ukulelerave:

such a needed campaign. i wish they’d have included native americans as well, though, as cultural appropriation of them in costumes is just as awfully common.



It’s that time of year again when these go around. And I will keep reblogging them. And if I see the joke ones I am likely to rip them apart with prejudice.

I will reblog this every year and unfollow anyone who posts joke fandom spinoffs of this very serious and important commentary.
Zoom Info
gossipseer:

witchlingfumbles:

soufflenatural:

ukulelerave:

such a needed campaign. i wish they’d have included native americans as well, though, as cultural appropriation of them in costumes is just as awfully common.



It’s that time of year again when these go around. And I will keep reblogging them. And if I see the joke ones I am likely to rip them apart with prejudice.

I will reblog this every year and unfollow anyone who posts joke fandom spinoffs of this very serious and important commentary.
Zoom Info
gossipseer:

witchlingfumbles:

soufflenatural:

ukulelerave:

such a needed campaign. i wish they’d have included native americans as well, though, as cultural appropriation of them in costumes is just as awfully common.



It’s that time of year again when these go around. And I will keep reblogging them. And if I see the joke ones I am likely to rip them apart with prejudice.

I will reblog this every year and unfollow anyone who posts joke fandom spinoffs of this very serious and important commentary.
Zoom Info
gossipseer:

witchlingfumbles:

soufflenatural:

ukulelerave:

such a needed campaign. i wish they’d have included native americans as well, though, as cultural appropriation of them in costumes is just as awfully common.



It’s that time of year again when these go around. And I will keep reblogging them. And if I see the joke ones I am likely to rip them apart with prejudice.

I will reblog this every year and unfollow anyone who posts joke fandom spinoffs of this very serious and important commentary.
Zoom Info

gossipseer:

witchlingfumbles:

soufflenatural:

ukulelerave:

such a needed campaign. i wish they’d have included native americans as well, though, as cultural appropriation of them in costumes is just as awfully common.

It’s that time of year again when these go around. And I will keep reblogging them. And if I see the joke ones I am likely to rip them apart with prejudice.

I will reblog this every year and unfollow anyone who posts joke fandom spinoffs of this very serious and important commentary.

(via iamsmallcinnamoncat)